Advertising/Marketing: Technological Design

March 25, 2008 at 5:04 pm 2 comments

Today in my advertising class about strategic communications, Sydney Brown, an Instructional Design Technology Specialist for UNL, spoke to us. Her job, and the points of her speech, were knowing how to design, develop, and deliver online/telecommunications content. The following are key points/quotes from her speech that inspired my thoughts.

    1) “It is fast, this talking thing!” – The Impersonal side of Technology
    Brown told of having to “relearn” phone skills because she was so used to texting instead of talking. She mentioned that her significant other complained of her abrubt ending to conversations, a result of her being used to getting to the point with a text and just stopping.
    We live in a world where cell phones are often in hand, but they seem to more frequently stay to the front of our face for texting, than to the side for speaking. Typing may be slower than speaking, but actual oral communication lends emotions often lost in an texted, IMed, or e-mailed phrase such as “its ok c u l8r” which may be more melancholy than the recipient actual reads into it. However, it is quicker to “get to the point” than having to lead up to it with small talk and then concluding a phone call.

    2) “Thank God for the internet! There are people like me!” – and how – “Facebook is the WhitePages of our time.” – Difficult Demo/Psychographics
    In describing the social standard, Brown threw out the term demassification. Her definition was how people will find their own social niche, and will become so involved in that interest area that they will exclude all else. In reference to the quotes, the internet and social neteworking sites such as Facebook allow people to find other’s like them, forming connections with like-minded persons. I identified with her example about those kids who come from small towns and high schools where they may be the only one who has the interests/abilities that they do. Therefore, “Thank God for the internet! There ARE people like me!”
    Thanks to the opportunity to develop such sectioned interests, marketing and advertising campaigns are faced with difficult demo- and psychographics. Brown also said that companies have to “capture you in motion.” Niched groups provide better access to specific target markets in places such as magazines or websites, but are difficult for broader products, such as food.

    3) “Constant pinging” – and – “Explore what you see” – Connectional Discovery
    To “ping” (in the most basic definition) is to send data to test a connection, such as between networked computers. Brown used it to describe how texts, e-mails, and social sites keep connections so handy that we constantly use them to check out what or who is on the other side. She also brought up the point that “as much as we use machines, we also want to talk to a real person.” This point comes more into play with things such as customer service FAQ pages or telephone hotline help. (A trick she suggests is to continually press zero and soon you’ll get a real person!)
    Part of the ping process, communicational speaking, is searching to learn more. That’s where Brown says to “explore what you see.” When visiting a companies website, don’t just read or look at the center content, but pay attention to the sides as well. Don’t go into it searching just for something in particular, but allow yourself to discover and connect with other elements.
    Brown described how advertising campaigns use this general idea of connectional discovery best in viral campaigns. A viral message is one that is so potent, the audience feels compelled to pass it along to everyone they know. (Check out this new one from MSN that I admit I had to do right away!)

    4) “Be willing to kill your own children!” – Being Detached from your Designs
    A good point but a hard lesson to learn is that the designs you love most may not be what works or what the client wants. The upside is that this forces you to be creative on more levels by coming up with a myriad of possible solutions. The greatest idea you think you have may ultimately be overshadowed by a smaller budget but a more lovable overall effect.

    I believe Brown had several good points to keep in mind when designing for online/telecommunications markets, and I hope you find them useful as well!

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    Entry filed under: Advertising, design, Marketing, Thoughts/Comments/Ideas. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

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    2 Comments Add your own

    • 1. Advertising/Marketing: Technological Design  |  March 25, 2008 at 5:17 pm

      […] Project Silence wrote an interesting post today onHere’s a quick excerptAdvertising/Marketing: Technological Design Today in my advertising class about strategic communications, Sydney Brown, an Instructional Design Technology Specialist for UNL, spoke to us. Her job, and the points of her speech, were knowing how to design, develop, and deliver online/telecommunications content. The following are key points/quotes from her speech that inspired my thoughts. 1) “It is fast, this talking thing!” – The Impersonal side of Technology Brown told of having to “relearn […]

      Reply
    • 2. advertise  |  March 27, 2008 at 10:57 am

      […] the existing and potential growth within the European online advertising marketswww.idaireland.comAdvertising/Marketing: Technological DesignPoints on knowing how to design, develop, and deliver online/telecommunications […]

      Reply

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    About the Author

    Stephanie Scharf currently resides in Lincoln, NE. She attends the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and is studying Advertising with an emphasis on graphic and web design. Her time is split between working on school and client projects, hangin' with friends, and "geeking out" by reading up on the latest in web and social media trends. For more information, please visit the About page.

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